Interview With Fred Alan Wolf, Ph.D
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Written by Edie Weinstein-Moser   
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Interview With Fred Alan Wolf, Ph.D
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 Edie:  For those who have not seen “What The Bleep…” how would you describe it?

Fred Alan Wolf:  It’s a spiritual movie, based upon this knowledge we currently have of quantum physics and some off-shoots of it, including some speculative thoughts about water, and some of the experimental evidence that people can change the optical properties of water crystals by thought or by feeling in some way,

Quotation people can change the optical properties of water crystals by thought or by feeling in some way, Quotation
into how the biology of the body works. All that is the intellectual stuff. That is embedded into an ordinary time story, of a young woman who is having typical kinds of problems that young women have in pursuing their lives and making ends meet.

 Edie:  Has anyone thought to take the water molecule experiment a step further and use actual bodily fluids, since we are made up of a high percentage of water?

 
 

Fred Alan Wolf:  It’s a good idea; looking at urine for example, or blood to see if there are any changes there. 

 Edie:  How has playing a key role in the movie changed your life?

 Fred Alan Wolf:  Very much so, in amazing ways. One thing that’s happening, is that I’ve gotten extremely busy. I’m at the so-called age where people who aren’t my age are doing one of two things: they either have already been retired for five years, or are in the process of dying. I’m in the process of working harder than I’ve ever worked, and willing. I’m having fun and doing what I want to do. It’s nice to make this kind of money. I’ve never made money like this before. I’m basically a mild mannered Clark Kent. Now I’m becoming Dr. Quantum. I’m going to be going around to High Schools to talk with students about stuff. I’m going to appear in England and promoting “What the Bleep..”  I’ll be at Omega on May 13th (2006) and the book expo in New York City.

 Edie:  I know that you’re intrigued by time travel. How would you define time?

Fred Alan Wolf:  I have a funny answer for that. When St. Augustine was asked to define time, he said  “I know what it is, but when you ask me to describe it to you, I don’t know what it is.” It’s kind of a funny thing to try to define. I try to look at time in every conceivable operational, that is, hands-on,way that we could possibly do it. It goes from looking at clocks, to experiencing our own internal sense of time, and the time of day and night; the usual things we infer about time, and what all that is. Then we have something we experience; in order to make sense of and objectify, we’ve labeled as time. Actually nothing in that experience is anything like time.


What we call time is the relationship of these shots of experiences and events. I don’t know how to define these events, because I have to use an implicit notion of time, and that’s what makes time so slippery. Memory gives us a sense of time, and anticipation of the future gives us a sense of time, and recollection of the past gives us a sense of time.


When we try to define time in physics, we get into all kinds of trouble, because in thought, time is the same for everybody, but in Einstein’s Theory of Relativity and quantum mechanics, they find that time is even more slippery, because there is no absolute time,

Quotation but in Einstein’s Theory of Relativity and quantum mechanics, they find that time is even more slippery, because there is no absolute time, Quotation
and two people can go from one event to the next and one person can feel and sense and measure by their own clocks that hours passed, and another person going through the same event may experience it in a manner of seconds. There’s a relativity in time. There is no absolute time. In quantum physics, we are looking at ways to move through time, now there are several schema which I talk about in my book “The Yoga of Time Travel: How the Mind Can Defeat Time.”

 
 Edie:  As you travel the globe, what commonalities do you discover in people?
 
  Fred Alan Wolf:  There is one basic thing that seems to be inevitably present in all people, which I would call a natural tendency to be compassionate. It may be the only thing that is absolutely the same in all people, and I would call it the inherent spiritual nature of the human condition.  What’s not natural is the desire to have power over another. It occurs when an animal is hungry. I think our acts of brutality, of craziness….in order to train people to go to war, you do have to train it in; it’s not natural.

 

 

 

 

This article was reprinted with permission from New Visions Magazine, www.newvisionsmagazine.com.


Edie Weinstein-Moser
About the author:

Edie Weinstein-Moser, LSW is a social worker, interfaith minister, writer, speaker and clown, who finds that the peace she discovers on the yoga mat follows her off the mat. She can be reached via her website at www.liveinjoy.com or 215-249-9190.

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